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today in what could be the last chance to come talk before the u.s. falls off the fiscal cliff next week. >>> investors are bracing for the final eurozone bond sale of the year. italy will sell up to 6 billion later today. >> and the yen has been sent lower and stocks to their highest level in 21 months. >>> this is the final "worldwide exchange" from london of the year. louisa is here for it. >> i can't believe it. it's my last working day of the year, as well. >> is it? >> yes. >> unfortunately we'll still be talking about the same thing we're talking about now. >> although i feel we'll be talking more debt ceiling, as well. >> and speaking of which, president obama is trying a last ditch effort to restart budget talks days before the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff. speaker john boehner has called the house back into session sunday evening. house majority leader eric cantor is telling his members to be prepared to work through january 2nd. both sides are still far apart on taxes and spending cuts. harry reid says prospect deals by monday are unlikely. minority leader mitch mcconnell s
it in perspective. the euro/u.s. dollar didn't move that much whatsoever. from that point of view, i don't think that we just have to look at today or the last two days of development in euro/u.s. dollar. of course, global trade is really important for the german economy. it continues to be very important. even from a private consumption point of view, we did have quite a bit of support as of late. also because of the wages. and looking at the world bank report, also looking at the asian economies in 2013, 2014, them seeing a little better picture is very good for the german economy and not to speak about the turnaround in the u.s. which seems to be stabilizing, looking this also at the housing market. so business sentiment better than expected. it is rising. the current conditions a little weaker than expected. add to that the financial analyst numbers we had as of late, also better than expected. not too bad. >> patricia, we'll see you again next hour. thank you very much for following all the latest there. >> sure. >>> now, shares in ubs have edged up in early trade after the bank announced a
to u.s. exporters may be showing signs of stabilizing, maybe get to growth. so that might mean moderation in the eurozone might ease in the first quarter. but again, this is all dependent on what happens with that ongoing debt crisis and any step back in resolving that would obviously have a knock-on effect to the economy. >> i'm wondering whether germany as we look at -- they're just above sort of recession territory at the moment. i'm wondering whether if they get better growth out of asia, that will offset the weakness that they're seeing in europe enough to keep them above the pencil line. >> what we've seen so far with today's numbers is exports are declining very sharp. they'll need asia and the u.s. to offset some of that demand weakness, but again, the biggest market for most is the euro zone. if the eurozone is performing badly, that will have a thok-on effect for those countries. >> there's a number of strategists saying after the u.s. has sort of led equities for most of the year, they're now saying europe is the place to be. from i think really the question you have
of just 2.5% in the u.s., 1.5% in canada and zero growth in the uk. locally, cutbacks in government spending weighed on the numbers and lower commodity prices also impacted on cash flow and the government is facing more criticism about its effort to keep the budget in surplus while the economy grows. >> the government has had the objective of making sure that we would bring our budget back to surplus when growth has been around trend. what we've been seeking to do through good budget policy has been to provide maximum flexibility to the reserve bank to a just rate so. the government will always put in place appropriate budget settings which will support growth and jobs. >> still, analysts say growth could slow further as the mining investment boom peaks. yesterday, the bank of australia cut interest rates to a record low of 3% and traders are looking further easing next year to offset the falling talks of trade, the high australian daughter and further cutbacks in government spending. >> despite that prognosis for rates and the fact that we're now matching the record lows here, the
u.s. citizens from adopting russian children. the decision raising tensions between the two countries, seen for retaliation for a new law in the u.s. that seeks to punish russians for human rights violations. the ban will take effect on january 1st, that's really right away it would halt all new adoptions and end those already in progress. incredible. a lot of families in the process of adopting children in russia. >> those poor kids. >>> want to move on to the weather. lots of snow, wind, hail everywhere across the u.s. the storm that brought snow and spun off tornadoes is still not over. ten deaths blamed on the storm. more than 2,400 flights have been canceled. it could dump more snow on new england and upstate new york today. boy, they don't need that. bonnie schneider with a look at the forecast. good morning. >> good morning. the storm we've been talking about is working its way to extreme northeastern new england. it is hitting canada hard. quebec is getting more snow. i mentioned yesterday that cold air would come in behind the system. it sure has. scranton at 26. be
national defense, history and geography of, and the u.s. economy. a television series based upon pages history of the estates is currently in development as well. we are pleased to welcome dr. schweikart today to hear about his newest book, "a patriot's history of the modern world," which in this case is going to be from 1898 to just after the second world war. please join me in welcoming larry schweikart. larry? [applause] >> well, thanks so much to heritage foundation for inviting me here. it's really an honor and it's one that which my father was alive to see. heritage is one of those great passions of liberty and a swelling sea of collectivism. you probably do know that you are getting somebody here that was a previous rock drummer. this later became significant in learning, as a learning experience when i began working on this film. but all along my expenses in the rock band were pretty informative. i, student i know all about communism because i was in a rock band. we shared everything, had nothing and start. when mike allen and i wrote "a patriot's history of the united states"
of what they sell and produce is exported all around the world. they want the u.s. economy to be stronger as quickly as possible and robust as quickly as possible because it means they'll continue to ask for. as much as they try to move from an export economy to a domestic consumption-based economy, and the reality is the more americans were coming for money they have in the pocket and the more they'll be shopping in stores. the healthier the u.s. economy is, the more they china will export and that means jobs for the chinese people. >> how much are they actually worried about the united states and how much time and attention are they paying to overdo it and enough relationship versus there are internal issues? >> i think the united states is incredibly important in china and they recognize that not only did their part to always ambassador locke has just described, but in another way i think you could say it's more psychological. it's a 150 year history where china has been trying to chain itself up into big power status. it's not there is very close to being there. get their just lingeri
iran said its elite republican guard has captured a u.s. spy drone over its airspace, showing it off on television. the u.s. navy denies it. martha raddatz has the latest on the tit for tat. >>> december heat wave. record-breaking temperatures, now sending the eastern half of the country back to the beach, as a brand-new storm is on track to wallop the west with heavy rain. areas already flooded this week, right in its path. >>> and caught on tape. the astonishing video from a routine traffic stop. watch this shocking surprise for police, as they surround a suspicious vehicle, revealing a young kidnap victim taken from his job. how did police find him just in the nick of time? >>> and little rain out in times square. good morning, everyone. hi to robin at home. great to have elizabeth vargas right here. and there is lara, standing by in london with all the latest on the big baby news. we have a lot to go to on that. >>> also at home, new developments in the tax showdown in washington. a deal has to get done by january 1st or everyone's taxes will go up. we'll talk about what i
, brian. they were some of the most popular presidents in u.s. history and all elected to a second term. but it couldn't save them from the dreaded second term curse. it dated back to 1936 when president roosevelt won 46 out of 48 states. he used those results in an attempt to shake up the supreme court and that tarnished his reputation. fast forward to 1984. president reagan's economic recovery turned 49 of the 50 states red. the inran contraservice surface americans didn't like being kept in the dark . then the scandal impossible to forget. >> i want you to listen to me. i will say it again. i did not have sexual relations with that woman: >> gretchen: nick is a presidential historian and author of the book presidential leadership. decisions that changed the nation and he's my guest this morning. >> morning, gretchen. >> gretchen: looking back in history president obama is now reelected to the second term. what do we suspect about the curse. >> it is an interesting topic it is difficult . going all the way back to wilson and league of nation . fdr and truman got run out of office . th
it is manufacturing, but is there really a demand question about apple's products that is a real one? >> not in the u.s., but there could be some questions about china, remember that report from steve milanovich? he said apple needs to come up within some real innovations, you need to have some clarity on the pipeline, and you need geographic -- clearance to go into china? yes, it got it with two of the smaller carriers. china confirms talks with apple. but the problem here, he says tech is not an issue, it's mainly about the business model and benefit sharing issues. that could be a problem. >> he is also playing the part of what many analysts are doing, which is let me explain why it's going down, in the same way that the death cross, i always love the death cross, this is a technical term. i can think of a million reasons to sell it. the only reason i want to own it is because it makes the best products in the world and it's inexpensive. >> that's a lot of people looking at the chart. >> look again, the people who own apple, they were the ones who owned it because it was going up. it reminds me very
's not going over well with the rest the world, including the u.s. and china. now we have some of the richest people in the world and they want the government to make more of your money. warren buffett, george soros, bill gates' dad they want the estate tax to go up and say the rate should start at 45% and go up from there. and millions would qualify to pay, but buffett and soros have an estate plan to avoid much of that tax. i'm quoting now, an estate tax with these guidelines to reduce the deficit and fund vital services and paid by only 10% of the estate. work your whole life and half of it goes to the children and half to the government and of course it's already been taxed when you earned it in the first place, is that fair? we're dealing with that today. i'm waiting for my special dividend from microsoft, but the company i own shares in has ramped up production of its new surface tablet. maybe that will help the stock. are you listening, steve ballmer? nicole, pre-market, where is the stock? >> stuart, you're making me laugh already and the show has barely begun. you're waiting for your
. >> 6:22 eastern. quick headlines overnight. president obama sending 50 u.s. troops into africa and tasked with helping evacuate u.s. citizens from the advancement to the capital. the senate faces an uphill battle in the republican-controlled house and pushing to cut the bill down to 24 billion. they say it's loaded with unnecessary amendments, guys. >> juliet: thanks, dave. >> clayton: well, as we get ready to cash out of 2013, the biggest celebrity meltdowns. >> juliet: and joining us is a behavior expert. >> good morning, juliet. >> juliet: let's start with this one. she was on the the show and lovely, but i don't know what's happened to her. she kind of just, i don't know. >> clayton: what's happened to her, patrick? >> well, she-- i'm not attracted to alcohol and pub scenes, but arrested for dui, arrested for leaving the scene of two separate accidents and what does she do? in an act of narcissism and entitlement she tweets that the united states president should fire the arresting officer as if she's saying to the u.s. president, you're my daddy, rescue me. >> juliet: in a
, it is not a philanthropic act on the pentagon's part to instruct boeing to build. -- to build in the deficit areas of the u.s. it is pragmatic. the united states federal government -- unless europe is dollarized, unless they do not have dollars to spend purchasing -- unless those who do not have dollars are given dollars to spend purchasing, the net exports of those who have surpluses, then they will stop having surplus. this is the surplus recycling mechanism. thus, we have the 20 years of the golden age. the 1950's and the 1960's. a period of immense stability very low inflation. very low unemployment. universal growth. we had other problems. the lease from the macroeconomic point of view, it was a golden age. why did it end? because the global surplus of recycling mechanism could no longer be sustained. why? because the united states stopped having a surplus by the end of the 1960's. how can you recycle surplus if you cannot have it. -- if you do not have it? enter a young turk in 1971. actually, he was the american, but you know what i mean. well, paul volcker -- that name may ring a bell. in 1971, paul
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this year the president singled out that threat posed by chemical weapons as a cause for greater u.s. involvement. now secretary clinton giving this warning. where do you see this headed? >> this is a very overt declaration by the secretary. it's been estimated it would take about 75,000 troops to secure these chemical weapon sites if they are used. syria has never acknowledged having them but acknowledged that when responding said they would not use them. so that issue is becoming very concerning as wellington as along the border of turkey, multiple infractions along that border. today vladimir putin is meeting with the turkish prime minister to talk about the situation. it's entering into a phase of deeper concern as the rebels don't make advances and capture territory and gain more international legitimacy. >> will the u.s. get into the public business ever supplying we fons the syrian rebels? >> right now that does not seem to be the case. others are, qatar and others in the region are supplying man portable air defense systems, shooting down planes as a result and helicopters of
from the u.s., which was dragging its feet. the final plan, the german plan, would be to soften air bases then in lit august or september crush the remnants of the r.a.f. it was a good plan but it wasn't working and goring got hitler's permission to bomb the ports. bombing was so ineffective on both sides that meant they would be bombing houses. they did. and churchill said give it back to them. that was the beginning. so, the blitz starts on september 7, i think, the evening. and germans came 81 of the next 82 nights or something like that. and the terror bombing they feared and predicted began. and there was no stopping the bombers. host: how many were killed and how many wounded in great brita britain? guest: i think about 40,000 to 45,000 londoners and 60,000 throughout then the rockets came. 60,000 people in a country of 47 million, you extrapolate, that would be at the time almost 2 200,000 americans, unimaginable numbers then and now for us in the united states. host: physically what did winston do during that time, where did he live? how did he relate to london and great bri
it was a scare tactic to build up the army. it did not help the u.s. was dragging its feet. the final plan, the german plan would be to soften up air bases in late august, early september, crushed the remnants of the raf. it was a good plan. while daring -- goering got pillar's permission to bomb the ports -- bombing was so ineffective for both sides. churchill said, give it back to them. and that was the beginning. so, the blitz starts on september 7 in the evening. the germans came the next 81, 82 nights, something like that. and the terror bombing that they had feared and predicted began. there was no stopping the bombers. the bombers always got through. >> tommy people were killed and wounded in great britain? >> i think about 45,000 londoners were killed. at the end, the v2 rockets came. 60,000 people in a country of 47 million. you extrapolate -- that would be almost 200,000 americans. unimaginable numbers now in united states. >> physically, what did winston churchill do during that time? where did he live? how did you relate to london during the blitz? >> he, with reluctance, left
fascianista and mentor about to get a major promotion from the president? is she qualified to be a u.s. ambassador and run an embassy? we ask you ladies and gentlemenn of the jury. >> brian: she would be best dressed. fired for being a man. bell ringer was silenced because the girls bring in more christmas cash. is that true? "fox and friends" starts right now. ♪ >> steve: welcome aboard, folks. live from studio e. brian has a lot of friend exercise family members that watch the program. call him throughout the program today, because unbeknowns to you. prian cell phone has fallen through a hole of the jacket pocket and stuck in the lining. >> brian: it dropped through the lining and a secret passage. >> gretchen: give me that coat. >> brian: this is how i function. >> gretchen: somebody get scissors . i can feel the calls coming through. >> brian: there we go. hole in the pocket but i didn't know this big. no, you just. ♪ there is a hole in the pocket. >> brian: i am going to lose it >> gretchen: you have scissors. >> steve: oh, don't. >> gretchen: double scissors. >> steve: you ca
of a u.s. tank. these will are just some of the excerpts of his beliefs about american or foreign policy as relates to the war. >> steve: as soon as that came out, it's like wait a minute, you can't invite him to this white house event. in fact, for a little while on white house.gov, there was a petition saying, you got to uninvite him. so what does he do? he apologized. he said in part, quote, while i'm grateful for the freedom to express one's self, i have learned there are limits to what language is appropriate. goes on, i will be forever sorry for any pain i have caused anyone by those words. you know what? >> brian: like him and his pocketbook. >> steve: now that he's a big star, he's taking it back because he wants to continue to make a lot of money on that thing. and had he not been invited to the white house, i bet he he would not be doing any apologizing. >> brian: just think about this, how could you be any prominent south korean and not be thankful to the americans for what we've done for that country that, country would not exist without america. for him to say those brutal w
more than any other. >> what you're looking at here is the grant of honoring u.s. citizenship to winston churchill and of course you have there the citation signed by president kennedy and then the u.s. passport which sadly wynton churchill never used. >> so in other words, as much as churchill loved america, america loved churchill. >> absolutely. and that really is what this exhi business is all about. >> churchill was a great reader and writer of history. he engaged with history. and that's with american history just as much as european history. >> so the bromance between fbr and winston is one of people's favorite stories in the second world war. and here it is, a present from roosevelt to churchill in his 70th birthday. what exactly is it. >> these are lines by abraham lincoln that roosevelt will sent churchill for his 70th birthday and a wonderful inscription where he has written at the bottom for winston on his birthday, i would go even to-- to within him again. >> and church sill someone who lived by his pen. his whole career is underpinned by writing. >> he actually r
and rights of the house. signed, sincerely, david russell, district liaison, u.s. representative david price. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the house stands adjourned until 2:00 >> we are going back to the conference on women in leadership with andrea mitchell and nancy-ann deparle. >> she gave me the notion i could do anything i wanted to do. >> how did she do that? >> she had very high expectations and let me know she expected me to do well in school. when i would talk to her about wanting to work in the white house for being interested in politics or being a lawyer, she said you have to study hard and make good grades. you need to get a scholarship because i will not be able to afford it. she never said -- the sky was the limit. that really was her view. it made me think i could do anything. i did go to law school. in the early 1980's when i got out of law school, i went back to tennessee to practice. i was going around to law firms. there were not that many women in the law firms. i had guys interview me. they would sit me down and say, do you understand you have to try cas
william skinner in the middle of the 20th century on the his of some of the most influential people on u.s. soil, and they had the larger readership in the country second only to the bible. i mentioned earlier that one of the questions that writers are asked is so what's your book about. shortly thereafter they will ask how'd you find your story. and how i came upon the story had to do with my family. william skinner was my great, great grandfather. here is an image of him around the age of 30. he has just lost his first wife, nancy. he's a widower in this photograph with his two young daughters. and he'd also just opened his silk mill in the area that would become known as skinnerville. i find this photograph haunting. the intensity in his eyes just burns, just sears you. he's so driven, he's so ambitious. and yet tenderly clutching his daughters. this is a photograph of his first wife, nancy warner, and she died shortly after the death of their second daughter, nina. skinner married again to a woman named sarah elizabeth allen, she was known as lizzie, and she is the woman after whom i a
fall. every fall for the book festival called fall for the book, and one of the authors u.s. be at the book festival is brooke stoddard. here is his book, "world in the balance: the perilous months of june-october 1940". brooke stoddard, world war ii started about six months prior to your book. what was happening in europe in june 1940? >> the war had started in september 1939, peter, and germany had overrun poland. hitler's idea at this point was to invade france and knock britain out of the war thereby. with the intent later on to invade the soviet union. he hated communism. this is one thing that was really part of his agenda. he was actually going to invade france in the wintertime, ma in november-december. he had to put that off because -- spent of 1939? >> of 1939. because of the invasion plans fell into the hands of the french and the british, soy put off the invasion until may, and he came up with a new plan. the old plant actually had been similar to world war i. it was going to come through belgium, along the channel coast, and down into paris. but he had to compl
leader harry reid in the "new york times, returning to the u.s. capitol. his shadow. what's the relationship between harry reid and mitch mcconnell? guest: it's hard to tell. the rhetoric on the senate floor can be pretty tough. they call each other my dear friend whenever you want them on the c-span channels, but i think they both are in a frustrating position. senator harry reid does not have more than 60 members, so we cannot block a filibuster but senator mcconnell is adept at applying in cases where he'd want to block legislation. but i think they both have respect for each other's legislative skills and they have proven in the past that when they need to cut a deal, but can cut a deal and bring their party's members with them. host: john mccain writes a big budget deal is still worth doing. he points out to the history of some of these agreements, most notably with ronald reagan in the 1980's and president bush in 1991 in which republicans agreed to spending cuts that never happened while raising taxes. guest: that's right. there's a little confusion about how much s
. and we face a multitude of problems from abroad. the u.s. fiscal cliff, the slowing growth in china, above all the eurozone now in recession. people know that there are no quick fixes to these problems, but they want to know that we are making progress, and the message from today's autumn statement is that we are making progress. it is a hard road, but we're getting there, and britain is on the right track. >> will the chancellor resume his seat. now, look, let's be clear about this. the house knows well enough by now that i will afford a very full opportunity for questioning of the chancellor. but the more interruption, the greater the noise, the longer the session will take, and that cannot be right. so i appeal to members, please, to give the chancellor a courteous hearing as, indeed, if it becomes necessary i will appeal to government back benches to afford a fair hearing to the shadow chancellor. that's how it should be. the chancellor. >> mr. speaker, britain is on the right track, and turning back now would be a disaster. we have much more to do. the deficit has fallen by a q
. >>> this will be a christmas to remember for the family of jon hammar. the former marine is back in the u.s. after he was released from prison in mexico friday night. hammar was held in august after he passed into mexico with a family heirloom shotgun. that was a violation of mexican law and he faced up to 12 years in prison. >>> president obama has asked massachusetts senator john kerry to be secretary of state. he would replace hillary clinton who's leaving after this term. he's served in the senate for 27 years. he was a presidential candidate in 2004. kerry should have no problem getting confirmed. >>> police are trying to determine why a man shot and killed three people in the small central pennsylvania town of holidaysburg. one victim in friday's shooting spree was killed while decorate agriculture. hall for a christmas party. state troopers shot and killed the gunman after he rammed his car into a police car. three state troopers were injured and a shooting for the vishlg victims is planned for today. >>> voting is under way in the second round of egypt's constitutional
wears prada." now obama may give editor anna winter a new title. as the u.s. ambassador. details ahead on five five. ♪ ♪ [ female announcer ] the humana walmart-preferred rx plan p-d-p gives you a low $18.50 monthly plan premium... and select generic hypertension drugs available for only a penny... so you can focus on what really matters. call humana at 1-800-808-4003. >>> i'm bret baier. tonight on "special report," they say if the g.o.p. does not give in and accept a tax rate increase on high earners the president will let the nation go over the fiscal cliff and blame republicans. the president put it in his own words tonight. not all democrats are with the president on the tax issue. 20 senate democrats face re-election in two years. some of them might struggle with voting to raise taxes by more than $12.5 trillion. this is amateur video from syria purporting the show a government war plane on a bombing run in damascus. one of syria's neighbors get serious about self-defense. concerns about the chemical weapons on the rise. "special report" starts at #:00 eastern. now have back
winter a new title. as the u.s. ambassador. details ahead on five five. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] we all make bad decisions. like say, gas station sushi. cheap is good. and sushi, good. but cheap sushi, not so good. it's like that super-low rate on not enough car insurance. pretty sketchy. ♪ and then there are the good decisions. like esurance. their coverage counselor tool helps you choose the right coverage for you at a great price. [ stomach growls ] without feeling queasy. that's insurance for the modern world. esurance. now backed by allstate. click or call. >> announcer: 'tis the season of more-- more shopping, more dining out... and along with it, more identity theft. by the time this holiday season is over, an estimated 1.2 million identities may be stolen. every time you pull out your wallet, shop online or hit the road, you give thieves a chance to ruin your holiday. by the time you're done watching this, as many as 40 more identities may be stolen. you can't be on the lookout 24/7, but lifelock can. they're relentless about protecting your identity every minute of every day.
in america. there are more of his works in the u.s. than anywhere but britain. he influenced american painters such as frederic edwin church... and thomas moran, who became known as "the american turner." french painters, including claude monet, were also intrigued by him. monet saw an exhibition of turner's works in london in the early 1870s and noted with approval that the english artist "painted with his eyes open." the impressionists admired his ability to capture luminous atmospheric effects. by the end of the 19th century, j.m.w. turner's dream was realized-- landscape painting was elevated to a level unthinkable without the contributions he had made in fifty years of painting.
of breaking and penalized in the u.s. for breaking a law in india. those are the stories we write about. >> host: how come we have not heard about that before? >> guest: some of you have hear. one of them is the case of john and judy, they were selling bunnies in a little down of nixa, missouri, fined $90,000 for having the wrong permit. the government said, hey, pay on the website, $9 o ,000, but if you don't pay, in 30 days, you owe us $3.1 million. this is the stuff that your government's going to bull disguised people, and we frankly think it needs to stop. they are doing the same with taking people's land and saying you can't build it on it because it's a wetland, even though there's no water or stream or pond on the land. >> as a senator, what can you do to change policy? >> we've looked at some of these things, and we now constructed legislation to try to fix them. like on the wetlands, we say the clean water act says you can't discharge pollutants into waters. i don't have a problem with that, but your backyard is not navigable water and dirt is not a pollutant. we have to redef
capital in the u.s., wall street and at washington, d.c. i still think that's true. >> so many here. 1984, the business case for a national industrial strategy. 1982, post-conservative america. >> the idea there was you were not looking at traditional conservatives like under the reagan administration. i remember the old howard jarvis tax revolution in california and things like that. you had a whole sequence of radical conservatives also the beginnings of the religious right in the south. this was not a traditional conservatism. >> april of 2003, wealth and democracy, political history of american rich. >> that was more the politics of rich and poor but with a whole lot of detail. at that time you were really seeing what had been an early stage buildup. it was now a major buildup. it went on to be what we finally saw break apart in 2008. >> we talked about richard nixon. before him, what did you think of lyndon johnson and what is his legacy? >> i was never a fan of lyndon johnson. i don't think his legacy is terrific. he was obviously a very capable man. in a number of ways, he was like
branches. second, starbucks is expanding. opening 1500 new locations in the u.s., boosting the number of locations nationwide by 13%. >>> the president of egypt has returned to his palace today after angry demonstrators swarmed the palace on tuesday. they say the constitution violates the democratic principles for which they fought last year. >>> new signs that the middle class may not have to worry so much about their taxes going up at year's end. some key republicans are looking at extending the middle class tax cuts past the fiscal cliff deadline and postponing the battle over the tax cuts for the wealthy until next month. >>> some things going on at the hospital. two australian deejays called the hospital posing at queen elizabeth and prince charles and got through to kate's private nurse. shockingly, if you hear the audio, who briefed them on her condition. >>> and a health scare for anderson cooper. he says he went blind for almost two days. he actually showed a picture of himself wearing an eye patch. he says he lost his sight for some 36 hours last week, while reporting from p
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